Career insight

  • To the class of 2018: Commencement season highlights
    Straight from the nation’s leaders in business, philanthropy, the arts, and politics, a roundup of career and life advice for new grads (and pretty much anyone else).
  • Inspiration doesn’t happen by chance: It’s a quality you can cultivate for yourself and your team. Even better? It’s got real benefits, including a 125 percent boost in productivity.
  • As one of most depended-upon disaster relief organizations in the world, the American Red Cross seeks people ready to go “all in,” and makes sure they’re prepared for anything.
  • A job interview is your moment in the spotlight – but your message can get lost without the right stagecraft. Captivate your audience with openers (and closers) that land.
  • To land the interview, you need a cover letter that commands attention and demonstrates value. In this section-by-section primer, you’ll find out how to nail the lead, showcase your skills, and close with confidence.
  • Your peers have spoken, weighing in on what they want in a workplace, when they know it’s time to seek new opportunities, how they hunt for jobs, and more. Check out some top takeaways, see how your own experience compares, and find a link to our full report.
  • When you’re looking for your first purpose-driven position, it can be a challenge figuring out how to sell yourself. We asked some of our contributors for help.
  • Your first opportunity to make an impression is also your shortest: On average, your resume has less than 10 seconds to pique a hiring manager’s interest. Here’s how to make the most of your moment.
  • How one Music & Events Coordinator connects with thousands of young people – including a 35-city cross-country tour and a “virtual” 5k – to build a mental health movement.
  • To pass along some of the secrets behind their success, we asked the latest cohort of Georgia’s “Nonprofit Leader 30 Under 30 Awards” one question: What decision, experience, or principle has made the biggest difference in your leadership journey?
  • Does something about the job you’re considering feel “off” to you? Here’s how to tell if someone is trying to take advantage of your enthusiasm for finding your next big career opportunity.
  • The ups and downs of a Community Engagement Director who organizes all-hands-on-deck construction projects for other nonprofits, and the winding path she took to get there – including a stint as the turnaround CEO.
  • To support a network of 235 affiliate organizations, the hiring team at NeighborWorks America seeks dedicated, inquisitive problem-solvers, then sets them on a career-long course of learning and giving back.
  • Throughout 2017, Work for Good tapped leading HR experts and sector pros for tips on taking charge of the job hunt, acing the screening process, working smarter, and more. In this roundup of the stories that most stuck with us, you’ll find practical advice and inspiration to keep you on top of yo...
  • Looking to showcase your talent while on the job hunt? Find a skilled volunteer opportunity – or, better yet, design one yourself for the employer you’d most like to impress, with help from this step-by-step guide by Hands On Atlanta CEO Jay Cranman.
  • If you’re like a lot of jobseekers, you dread the moment when someone says, “Tell me about yourself.” But have you thought about why?
  • To keep building houses wherever they’re needed, Habitat for Humanity International requires a world of talent. Here’s what the talent-acquisition team looks for when populating that world, and how they help the much-loved organization stay effective and inspired.
  • Before miniaturizing your font, zeroing out your margins, or – worst of all – striking experiences that truly showcase your worth, try reconsidering the one-page resume “rule.”
  • Whenever we’re feeling stuck or stymied, it’s almost always a matter of perspective. Here’s how to snap out of it, and meet your next challenge with energy and confidence.
  • With the 24-hour media machine supplying an endless stream of news (much of it bad) directly to our phones, the way we consume news can have a huge impact on our stress levels – and our risk of burnout.